Servin’ them up on a Plate: Packers v. Bears — Deep Dish Pizza

Before every 2015 Packers game, we’re giving you a fun recipe to share at your Packer party courtesy of our favorite SE Wisconsin home-cooking extraordinaire, Stacy Joers*. For this week’s game, we’re serving up Chicago-Style Deep Dish Pizza.

lou malnatis

Photo courtesy of the original Lou Malnati’s Pizza, which some of you maybe be enjoying in Chicago.

Chicago-Style Deep Dish Pizza

Serving Size: 8 (1/4 of a deep dish)

1        recipe Deep Dish Butter Dough

24      ounces mozzarella cheese — thinly sliced

1        recipe Fresh Pizza Sauce

Pizza toppings: — (sausage, pepperoni, black olives, onions, mushrooms etc.)

1        cup parmesan cheese — shredded

Olive oil

Preheat oven to 475.

Divide the slices of mozzarella cheese evenly over the crusts. Spoon the sauce over the cheese.  Add any toppings you desire and sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Drizzle with a little olive oil.

Bake the pizza in preheated oven on the bottom rack for 5 minutes; move the pizza to the middle rack and bake an additional 30 minutes. Crust will be lightly browned and toppings, such as raw sausage will be cooked thru.

If baking 2 pizzas at once (not ideal) have the oven racks set 1 notch above bottom and 1 notch below top, add 15 minutes to baking time, and rotate half way thru.

Deep Dish Butter Dough

½       cup whole milk — warm, 110 degrees

1        cup water — warm, 110 degrees

2 ¼    teaspoons active dry yeast — or 1 1/2 t. instant yeast (bread machine yeast)

1        teaspoon sugar

3 ½    cups unbleached flour — all-purpose, divided

½       cup semolina flour

4        tablespoons olive oil

4        tablespoons butter — melted

1        teaspoon salt

In a large bowl, combine the milk, water, yeast and sugar; stir to combine. Let sit until the mixture is foamy; about 5 minutes.

Add 1 1/2 C. flour, the semolina, oil, butter and salt to the milk mixture, mixing by hand until it is all incorporated and the mixture is smooth. Continue adding the flour 1/4 C. at a time, working the dough after each addition, until all of the flour is incorporated but the dough is still slightly sticky.

Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth but still slightly tacky, 3-5 minutes.

Oil a large mixing bowl. Place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat all sides. Cover the bowl loosely with plastic wrap and set in a warm place until doubled in size; about 1 1/2 hours.

Oil the bottom and sides of 2–12″ deep dish pizza pans. Divide dough into 2 pieces. Stretch a ball of dough gently with your hands to about 1/2 the size of the pizza pan. Put the dough in the pan and stretch it with your fingers and palms until it completely covers the bottom of the pan. Pull the dough up the sides of the pan to form a pronounced border. Cover the pan with a kitchen towel and let rise for 30 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough and pan. (After dough rises again in pan, you may need to repress up the sides)

Follow instructions for filling/baking your deep dish pizza from the deep dish recipe.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 169 Calories; 7g Fat (34.9% calories from fat); 4g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 9mg Cholesterol; 167mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain (Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

NOTES: Use for Chicago-style Deep Dish Pizzas and Ponzerottas.

This recipe will make 2–deep dish pizzas or 6-8 Ponzerottas.

Fresh Pizza Sauce

168    ounces (6–28 oz. cans) tomatoes, canned — whole, crushed by hand and drained very well

2        tablespoons dried oregano — heaping

2        teaspoons dried basil — heaping

Salt — to taste

Drain the tomatoes very, very well in a colander for 1 hour or more. Discard juice.

Combine tomatoes, oregano, basil and salt. Mix well and use for your favorite pizza. This is enough sauce for 2 Chicago-style deep dish pizzas.

staci2012

*Stacy Joers is a Caledonia resident, has her degree in Culinary Arts and teaches cooking demonstrations all over SE Wisconsin since 1992. Information about her classes is available at www.cookingwithclass.com.

Servin’ Them Up On a Plate – Packers vs Saints – Dirty Rice

Before every 2015 Packers game, we’re giving you a fun, yummy recipe to share at your Packer party courtesy of our favorite SE Wisconsin home-cooking extraordinaire, Stacy Joers*. For this week’s game, Thursday, September 3rd, we’re serving up DIRTY RICE. 

Emeril's Delmonico Dirty Rice

Photo is of Emeril’s dirty rice served at his Delmonico restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana

DIRTY RICE

Serving Size : 8

1 whole chicken — cut up

1 quart water

1/2 cup butter

2 cups converted rice

2 large onions — diced

1 large green pepper — diced

3 stalks celery — diced

6 cloves garlic — minced

1/4 cup parsley — minced

1 tablespoon creole seasoning

1 teaspoon salt

black pepper — to taste

Place chicken pieces in a large saucepan and cover with water (true Cajuns use the giblets, as well). Bring to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes – 1 hour, or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Skim any scum that rises to the surface during the simmer time. Remove the chicken from the stock and allow chicken to cool enough to be handled, then remove chicken from bones and dice (dice giblets, too, if using). Place chicken meat back in the stock and keep warm.

Melt butter in a heavy bottomed saucepan and saute the rice until it is starting to brown. Add the onions, green pepper and celery and saute a few minutes more. Add the garlic and parsley and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chicken and the stock to the rice. The liquid should be about 1 inch above the rice; if needed, add more water.

Add seasonings and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until most of the liquid has evaporated, stirring occasionally. Cover and cook over very low heat for about 15 minutes more. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for about 10 minutes.

When ready to serve, stir well.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 574 Calories; 31g Fat (49.0% calories from fat); 29g Protein; 44g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 149mg Cholesterol; 575mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 3 1/2 Lean Meat; 1 Vegetable; 4 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrate

NOTES : To make jambalaya, use this dirty rice recipe except for the giblets. I put whatever I want, sometimes shrimp, smoked sausage, ham, or whatever. The shrimp jambalaya is the best. Add tomatoes to make it a red jambalaya.

Can use boneless chicken or other chicken pieces and brown before adding the rice. Then use canned chicken stock in place of the homemade.
Let us know what you think. GO PACK GO!

staci2012

*Stacy Joers is a Caledonia resident, has her degree in Culinary Arts and teaches cooking demonstrations all over SE Wisconsin since 1992. Information about her classes is available at www.cookingwithclass.com.

Packers vs Eagles – Servin’ Them Up On a Plate

Before every 2015 Packers game, we’re giving you a fun recipe to share at your Packer party courtesy of our favorite SE Wisconsin home-cooking extraordinaire, Stacy Joers*. During this week’s game, Saturday, August 29th, we’re serving up PHILLY CHEESESTEAKS.

PHILLY CHEESESTEAKS

phillycheesesteak01

Photo is a cheesesteak from Chubby’s Cheeseteaks in Milwaukee, so if you don’t want to cook, head on over to Chubby’s.

Serving Size : 4

4 Italian rolls

unsalted butter — for frying

1 pound rib-eye steak — shaved very thin

Cheez Whiz

Heat a large, cast iron skillet over med-high heat. Add 2-3 T. butter and swirl to melt but don’t allow to brown. Add slices of ribeye to pan. Add in only what fits in the bottom of pan, don’t overcrowd or meat will not brown. Brown on one side, turn and brown on other side. Move meat slices to side of pan and add more raw meat to cover bottom. After flipping second batch, begin to cut up first batch with the end of your spatula. When nicely shredded, transfer to a bun and top with Cheez Whiz.  Serve.

Move second batch of meat to side of pan and repeat until all meat and sandwiches are prepared. Add more butter when necessary.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 464 Calories; 35g Fat (68.4% calories from fat); 34g Protein; 3g Carbohydrate; 0g Dietary Fiber; 91mg Cholesterol; 1156mg Sodium. Exchanges: 4 Lean Meat; 4 Fat.

Serving Ideas : Very thinly sliced Top Round is a good substitute for ribeye.

Add in fried onions, mushrooms or peppers if you desire. You can also substitute provolone cheese for Cheez Whiz.
Let us know what you think. GO PACK GO!

staci2012

*Stacy Joers is a Caledonia resident, has a degree in Culinary Arts and teaches cooking demonstrations all over SE Wisconsin since 1992. Information about her classes is available at www.cookingwithclass.us

Packers vs Steelers – Servin’ Them Up On a Plate

Before every 2015 Packers game, we’re giving you a fun recipe for your Packer party courtesy of our favorite SE Wisconsin home-cooking extraordinaire, Stacy Joers*.  This week is another awesome game food sandwich – PITTSBURGH CHEESESTEAKS.

Pittsburgh Cheesesteak

Serving Size : 4

1 recipe sweet & sour cole slaw

1 recipe homemade french fries

4 Italian rolls — or 8 slices Italian bread

unsalted butter — for frying

1 pound rib-eye steak — shaved very thin

4 slices provolone cheese

One day prior, prepare the sweet & sour cole slaw (recipe below).

Early in the day cut, rinse, chill and pre-fry your french fries (recipe below).

When ready to serve, begin frying french fries and get enough for at least 2 sandwiches before beginning to cook steak. Keep warm in oven.

Heat a large, cast iron skillet over med-high heat. Add 2-3 T. butter and swirl to melt but don’t allow to brown. Add slices of ribeye to pan. Add in only what fits in the bottom of pan, don’t overcrowd or meat will not brown. Brown on one side, turn and brown on other side. Move meat slices to side of pan and add more raw meat to cover bottom. After flipping second batch, begin to cut up first batch with the end of your spatula. When nicely shredded, top with 1 slice of provolone and transfer to a bun. Top with a scoop of cole slaw and a handful of fries. Serve.

Move second batch of meat to side of pan and repeat until all meat and sandwiches are prepared. Add more butter when necessary.

Don’t forget to keep frying french fries so they’re always fresh for the sandwiches.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 464 Calories; 35g Fat (68.4% calories from fat); 34g Protein; 3g Carbohydrate; 0g Dietary Fiber; 91mg Cholesterol; 1156mg Sodium. Exchanges: 4 Lean Meat; 4 Fat.

Serving Ideas : Very thinly sliced Top Round is a good substitute for rib-eye.

Add in fried onions, mushrooms or peppers if you desire. Truly not necessary.

If you’re sandwich seems drippy and greasy-good job!! It’s perfect!!

NOTES : This is one of those recipes that requires you to be cooking while your guests begin eating. But, it’s well worth it!!

Sweet & Sour Coleslaw
Serving Size : 12

3 pounds cabbage — shredded

1 large white onion — finely diced

1 green pepper — thinly sliced

1 cup canola oil

2 cups sugar

1 cup cider vinegar

2 teaspoons celery seed

1 teaspoon salt

Layer the cabbage, onion and green pepper in a large bowl.

Place the remaining ingredients in a non-reactive saucepan and bring to a rapid boil for 1 minute. Pour over the cabbage mixture.

Let stand a minimum of 2 hours before serving. This salad is best if allowed to stand overnight. Stir well before serving. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 328 Calories; 19g Fat (48.7% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 42g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 200mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Vegetable; 3 1/2 Fat; 2 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

NOTES : I sometimes add a shredded carrot in with the cabbage. Red onion is also good in place of the white onion.

Homemade French Fries

russet potatoes

vegetable oil

salt

Scrub the potatoes well and cut into french fries. Size should be no more than 1/2″ square. Rinse very well until water runs clean.

Chill the fries before cooking. If they are nearly frozen when they first enter the oil, they will cook slower and more thoroughly. To do this, fill a bowl with water and ice and add the fries. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Rinse and pat dry before frying.

Fill your deep fryer with the specified amount of oil or use an electric frying pan or heat the oil on the stove and use a deep fry thermometer. Heat the oil to 325.

Line a large cookie sheet with brown paper grocery bags. Place a cooling rack over the paper.

Fry the french fries in batches in the 325 oil for about 3 minutes, until they begin to change color. Remove the fries with a wire skimmer and let them cool completely on the cooling rack for up to 4 hours.

Next, reheat the same oil to 375. Add the room temperature fries and fry in batches for 1-2 minutes or until crispy and golden. Once fries are removed from the fryer, place them back on the wire rack, salt and keep in the oven at 200 degrees while frying the rest. Enjoy!!

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 0 Calories; 0g Fat (0.0% calories from fat); 0g Protein; 0g Carbohydrate; 0g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 0mg Sodium. Exchanges: .

Serving Ideas : Spicy fries: mix 2 teaspoons each of the following: garlic powder, black pepper, tarragon leaves and Old Bay Seasoning. Sprinkle the spice mix over the fries and serve.

NOTES : I generally do 1 potato per person, depending on the size of the potato. I do not remove the skins, just scrub them very well.

Russet potatoes are starchy potatoes so be certain to rinse them very well or they will cloud the oil and stick together when frying.

Canola oil may be used in place of vegetable oil. Canola oil with a splash of safflower oil is also a good choice

ENJOY! GO PACK GO!

staci2012
*Stacy Joers is a Caledonia resident, has a degree in Culinary Arts and teaches cooking demonstrations all over SE Wisconsin since 1992. Information about her classes is available at www.cookingwithclass.us.

Packers v. New England – Serve the Patriots up on a plate

Before every Packers game this 2015 season we will give you a recipe from our favorite SE Wisconsin home cooking extraordinaire Staci Joers.   Packer fans can serve up the other team on a plate for their Packer parties or family gatherings with each recipe being a dish often served in the opponent’s part of the country.   This week Staci came up with an easy recipe that seems fancy, the Classic New England Lobster Roll.   Its a sandwich, its easy to make: perfect football food.

staci2012

Staci Joers is a Caledonia resident, has a degree in culinary arts and has taught cooking demonstration classes all over SE Wisconsin since 1992.  www.cookingwithclass.us   On September 3rd, Staci has a “Fall Harvest of Flavors” class in Caledonia which provides recipes to use up all those garden vegetables.   Details along with info on all her Milwaukee-area classes are on her website, linked above.

Classic Maine Lobster Roll

Lobster Roll

Serving Size  : 2     (Photo is from the Lobster Roll served at St. Paul Fish Market in Milwaukee — If you don’t feel like cooking, go pick a couple up at the Milwaukee Public Market)

2        hot dog buns — really, they use hot dog buns!

2        tablespoons  butter — melted

6        ounces  cooked lobster meat

mayonnaise — to taste

1/4     cup  celery — finely diced, optional

2        tablespoons  green onion — finely diced, optional

pinch  fresh Italian parsley — minced, optional

squeeze  fresh lemon juice — optional

dash  hot pepper sauce

Preheat your broiler or a non-stick saute large enough to hold the buns over medium heat. Brush the hot dog buns with melted butter and broil or grill in the pan until golden.

If you have fresh lobster (tails are the easiest to handle) bring about 2″ of water to a boil in a large pan that has a steamer insert. Place the tails (two 4-5 ounce tails will equal about 6 ounces of cooked meat) in the steamer basket and place the basket over the simmering water. Cover and steam for about 8 minutes or until cooked thru. Immediately submerge in ice water to stop the cooking.

Cut up your lobster meat and toss with just enough mayo to cover. Add celery, green onions, parsley, lemon and hot pepper sauce, if using. Scoop half of the mixture onto one bun and half onto the other and eat both while no one is looking!

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 312 Calories; 14g Fat (41.5% calories from fat); 21g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 92mg Cholesterol; 695mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 2 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 2 1/2 Fat.

NOTES : A classic Lobster Roll only has the lobster meat mixed with enough mayo to wet, plopped on a grilled hot dog bun. From there it varies with some places adding celery and green onions etc. I had it both ways and truly, you can’t go wrong not matter what!

Wisconsin Home Cooks: Nine herbs to plant soon and enjoy later

Staci Joers is a contributor to our group and author of this list.  Staci is a Caledonia resident, has a degree in culinary arts and has taught cooking demonstration classes all over SE Wisconsin since 1992.   http://www.cookingwithclass.us

staci2012

One of Staci’s upcoming classes on April 29, 2015 is Fresh Vietnamese Flavors at Uncorkt wine shop at 240 Main Street in Racine.   Staci shows the class how to make  spring rolls, pork banh mi, and pho, all perfectly paired with wines.   Sign up, you won’t regret it.  (see her website www.cookingwithclass.us (click here) to register.)  (Vietnamese Pho pictured below)

2014-12-03 17.24.06

Staci Joers:   Herbs are very easy to grow with a little sunshine, soil that drains well, some watering, and a little fertilizer or compost. Herbs can be grown in pots; however, the plants always prefer to be in the ground where they can spread out. I grow 90% of my herbs in the ground and I use 50% purchased garden soil and 50% composted soil (I contribute lots of goodies to my neighbor’s composter and get a bit of soil from them every year). Since I have begun using composted soil, I get double size plants that replenish faster. I dig nice size holes, remove some of the old soil and mixing the new soil with the compost and plant my herbs. Really having nice loose worked soil helps the herbs to drain and spread and generally grow better.

I start with healthy, strong plants rather than seeds (but I’m a lazy gardener). Most herbs like to be watered as soon as the soil located a couple of inches below the surface is dry to the touch. Since temperatures and humidity cause drying times to vary every week, you must check the soil often. Do not over-water. Most herbs prefer drier conditions to wet and too much water can lead to diseases or poor growing conditions for your Herbs, which will result in reduced growth.

To harvest most herbs, cut off about 1/3 of the branches when the plant reaches at least 6-8″ tall. By cutting close to a leaf intersection, your plants will regrow very quickly. Some plants, such as parsley, grow new leaves from their center. In this case the oldest branches need to be completely removed, leaving the new tiny branches growing from the center.  (All pictured herbs were photographed at Milaegers, Racine, Wisconsin)

1. Basil:

The leaves have warm, spicy flavor. Use in soups, sauces, salads, omelets and with meat, poultry and fish. Also a basis for pesto. Very versatile. I generally grow Italian Large Leaf Basil. I am personally not a fan of the hybrids like Lemon-Basil or Pineapple-Basil. I stick with the basics as that is what I will get the most use of and tweek the flavors with items like lemon zest to replicate that flavor when needed. Although I do also grow Thai Basil. This tropical variety of sweet basil provides the unusual Anise-like basil flavor present in so many Thai dishes that it has come to be identified as “Thai basil” in America, even though the Vietnamese and Laotians also use lots of it in their cuisines.

Basil

2. Chives:

One of my faves and impossible for even the worst gardener to kill. The leaves have a mild onion flavor and can be added to salads, egg and cheese dishes, cream cheese, mashed potatoes and more. Use flowers in salads or to flavor a vinegar.

Chives
3. Mint:

Lots of different varieties to choose from but be warned, mint is very aggressive and will take over a garden. I plant it under trees where I have a hard time controlling weeds. The mint will choke out everything else and it smells great on a warm summer day. I grow Peppermint which is the most famous of all mints; it requires little care and makes excellent teas and candy. Brew leaves into tea, or to garnish cold drinks. I also grow Spearmint is very intense in flavor and is generally used to make mint sauce or jelly. Sprinkle dried or fresh leaves over lamb before cooking. And the last mint that I grow is Chocolate Mint. This herb has dark, rich foliage. It tolerates hot, dry conditions and is not as invasive as most mints. A nice desert mint!

Mint
4. Parsley:

I only grow Italian Flat Leaf which is the best parsley for flavor. It’s super easy to grow, tolerates most soil and doesn’t need optimum growing conditions. You can mix it into salads, soups, stews, casseroles, and omelets. Serve fresh as garnish with meat, fish, and onion dishes.

Parsley
5. Sage:

Love, love, love it! But, again, an aggressive herb. Plant it where you can control it. It needs a good 3 ft. of room to spread. Dried leaves are a traditional constituent of poultry stuffing. Use also with lamb, pork, sausage, and in cheese dishes and omelets. Try slapping a little sage between your palms and adding it to your next Gin cocktail—yum!

Sage
6. Tarragon:

Mild anise-like flavor, it can be used in soups, salads, egg dishes, stews, and soft cheeses. Excellent with lamb and pork. Serve in melted butter with fish, steak, or vegetables; it is also the base for traditional Béarnaise Sauce. Makes good flavoring for vinegar when steeped for 2 or 3 weeks.

Tarragon
7. Thyme:

Lots of uses. Fresh thyme is milder and easier to eat than dried thyme so use it whenever possible. Rub chopped leaves into beef, lamb, veal, or pork before roasting. Sprinkle over eggs, cheese dishes, vegetables, fish, or poultry. Brew into tea with a little rosemary and mint.

Thyme

8. Rosemary:

Tough plant that can take heat well if kept moderately moist. You should prune regularily to promote new growth. I use Rosemary stems as a natural skewer for kabobs which infuses the food pieces with a mild rosemary flavor. It’s also great for vegetables, poultry, beef, seafood and Vodka or Gin cocktails.

rosemary1
9. Oregano:

Easy to grow perennial: plants thrive on little to moderate water. Oil is strongest when the plant is in bud but before flowers open. Cut back to 4 inches tall in late spring, summer, and fall. Used extensively in Italian cooking it is also great for beans, cheeses, eggs, meats, pastas, salsas, sauces, soups, stews, and vegetables.

Oregano

I am going to try something new this year, a vertical garden made from an old Pallet. I’ll take pics and report on my success (or lack of it) later in the spring/summer.

Staci’s ten ways to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with Cabbage

Staci Joers is a contributor to our group and author of this list.  Staci is a Caledonia resident, has a degree in culinary arts and has taught cooking demonstration classes all over SE Wisconsin since 1992.   http://www.cookingwithclass.us

One of Staci’s upcoming classes is Pizza Pizzazz. Staci shows the class how to make a pizzeria-style pizza including how to prepare a great pizza crust. The pizzas that the class will make are Individual Pizza Pot Pies, Jimmy’s Grotto-style Ponzarotta Pizzas (similar to a calzone), Buffalo Chicken Pizza and Chicago-style Deep Dish.   Sign up, you won’t regret it.  (see her website www.cookingwithclass.us to register.

Ok, on to the list.
Ten ways to use cabbage perfect for St. Pat’s! (or any other time you’d like to use this super versatile vegetable that us extremely good or you!)


1.     Stir-fry Cabbage:  “Dice a bit of bacon, saute it over low heat to render the fat and cook til crisp.  Remove the bacon. increase the heat to medium high and add a few handfuls of shredded cabbage, coat with bacon fat, a bit of salt and pepper and maybe a clove or two of minced garlic.  Cook until crisp tender.   Sprinkle with cooked bacon and serve with your St. Pat’s meal.”

2.     Braised Red Cabbage:  “Although thought of as a traditional German side dish the sweet/sour flavors of the red cabbage pair well with Corned Beef”

3.     Cabbage Slaw:  “Always a quick and easy way to make a large amount of salad to serve as a St. Pat’s side dish for a group.  Creamy or vinegar-based — it’s great any way you serve it!”

4.     Cabbage Soup:  “Use the flavors of St. Pat’s with leftover corned beef in broth with potatoes, carrots and cabbage.  Simmer it up until tender.”

5.     Cabbage Rolls:  “Stuff them with rice and beef, top with tomato sauce and bake for a traditional flavor or stuff them with your leftover Corned Beef dinner, cover with a bit of the broth and bake until tender.”

6.     Potatoes Colcannon:  “The traditional Irish side dish consisting of potatoes mashed with cabbage and a bit of nutmeg.”     (Staci’s Recipe is below)

7.      Smoked Head of Cabbage: “Whole head of cabbage basted with bacon fat and smoked on the grill.  Not a traditional side dish or St. Pat’s but oh, sooo delicious.”

8.     Pork and cabbage are natural partners.  “The sweetness of the cabbage really complements the juicy savory flavor of the port.  Season and brown up a pork roast and place it over chopped cabbage in an oven-safe roaster, add a diced apple, some caraway and celery seed, a splash of vinegar and even some bacon.  Cover and braise in a low oven until the pork falls apart.  300 degrees for two to three hours.”

9.     Sauerkraut –– “Buy it or make it homemade and use it on everything!”

10.     Sausage & Beer with Cabbage:  “Again, flavors that go really well together.  Brown up a kielbasa (or another of your favorite sausages in a bit of butter, toss in a small head of cabbage (red or green) that has been chopped; cook until cabbage wilts.  Add a splash of vinegar, a pinch of caraway and a cup or two of beef. Simmer partly covered until cabbage is tender.”

Staci Joers’ Colcannon

“Many will call Corned Beef and Cabbage Ireland’s “National Dish”, but that is just not so. Corned Beef and Cabbage is a new world dish that was widely unknown to many Irish people until they set foot on the famine boats that took them away to the “New World”. Colcannon is the true “National Dish”. It is served all over Ireland at every festival and celebration with many local variations, of course.”


Serving Size: 6
1 pound cabbage — after core is removed
1 teaspoon salt
2 pounds potatoes — scrubbed and sliced with skins on
2 medium leeks — washed and sliced
1 cup milk
½ teaspoon nutmeg
Salt and pepper — to taste
2 cloves garlic — minced
1 stick butter

Bring a pot of water to boil and add the salt and cabbage. Boil the cabbage until tender, about 12-15 minutes. Drain off the water and chop the cabbage. Set aside.

Bring another pot of water to a boil and boil the potatoes until tender. Drain off the water and set aside.

Put the leeks in a saucepan, cover with the milk, bring close to boiling and then turn down to simmer until tender. Set aside.

Add the mace, salt and pepper, and garlic to the pot with the potatoes and mash well with a hand masher. Now add the leeks with their milk and mix into the potatoes without breaking down the leeks too much. Add a little more milk if necessary to make it smooth. Now mash in the cabbage and lastly, the butter. The texture should be a smooth-buttery potato with interesting pieces of leek and cabbage.

Transfer the whole mixture to an ovenproof dish, make fork furrows on the surface and place under the broiler to brown.

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 320 Calories; 17g Fat (46.8% calories from fat); 6g Protein; 38g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 47mg Cholesterol; 560mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain (Starch); 1 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 3 1/2 Fat.